Panic Blog http://www.panic.com/blog Dispatches from Panic HQ in Portland, Oregon Mon, 01 Sep 2014 03:07:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 PunchClock: Fun With iBeacons http://www.panic.com/blog/punchclock-fun-with-ibeacons/ http://www.panic.com/blog/punchclock-fun-with-ibeacons/#comments Tue, 08 Jul 2014 21:24:38 +0000 http://www.panic.com/blog/?p=5516 PunchClockSometimes at Panic we build internal stuff that never sees the light of the outside world. This is one of those projects: an automatic in/out tracker for the Panic Team.

OK, sure, there’s not that many people that work here so it’s not a huge issue for our team, but it still seemed like something interesting to try. I originally hacked together an in/out tracker that used a combination of SNMP, ARP table lookups, and plain old port scanning to figure out who was theoretically “in”. It wasn’t so reliable and was eventually removed from our Status Board. What I didn’t know was that Apple would soon deliver a solution to our (not-so) mission-critical problem.

With the arrival of iBeacons in iOS 7, Apple was clearly moving into retail and public spaces in a whole new way. It was no longer enough to have an app for the store you are shopping in — the app could now react to your location within the store. iBeacons themselves typically do little more than broadcast an ID to notify your device that you’re near them. The idea is to spread these relatively cheap, dumb beacons around a space and then let iOS and a cloud service figure out what content the visitor should see.

Going further, iOS 8 adds a button to the lock screen when you’re in an area registered with Apple to provide indoor location tracking. That button launches the relevant app if you have it installed or takes you to the App Store if you don’t. Cool stuff.

With this new technology in-hand, it wasn’t too long before I put together a brand new office In/Out tracker called PunchClock. It uses a combination of a geo-fence and iBeacon tracking, plus a simple Sinatra backend hosted at Heroku. The part that took the longest to fine-tune was figuring out the right combination of polling to provide good location information without draining the battery.

Once we had reliable In/Out data, I thought it would be interesting to allow you to be notified (in a hopefully non-creepy way) the moment someone entered or left the office. The final notable feature of PunchClock is the ability to send push messages to everyone marked as “In” — mainly in case you get locked out of the office, or locked in the bathroom. Neven did some nice UI, Cabel made a couple of tiny notification sounds, and the app was complete.

While Apple’s iBeacon technology continues to be rolled out in big box stores and sports stadiums, there’s no reason you can’t put it to use in your own home or office now.

We’re making PunchClock available on Github so you can create your own In/Out tracker. The backend provides JSON data to the app as well as a DIY panel for Status Board.

To be honest, you’re going to have to be pretty technically-capable to set up your own instance of PunchClock. This isn’t a shipping retail product, and it’s not for the faint of heart. But if you’re a coder and you’re ready for a fun night of hacking, we’d love to see what you do with it. We’ll try to do our best to explain the process in the README for the app and backend.

PunchClock was fun for us, and we hope it’s fun for you.


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Coda 2.5 and the Mac App Store http://www.panic.com/blog/coda-2-5-and-the-mac-app-store/ http://www.panic.com/blog/coda-2-5-and-the-mac-app-store/#comments Wed, 14 May 2014 18:47:36 +0000 http://www.panic.com/blog/?p=5441 coda-logoOver a year ago, I wrote a blog post about Coda and Sandboxing.

It detailed a thorough list of changes we’d be making to Coda to work under Apple’s Sandboxing restrictions. Click here to read it if you haven’t.

As we continued to work on Coda 2.5—a significant update that we’re really excited about—we continued to discover new corners of the app that presented challenges under sandboxing. Coda, to be fair, is a very complex developer tool and is something of a sandboxing worst-case scenario.

Apple, to their considerable credit, spent a lot of energy assisting us with ideas, workarounds, and temporary exemptions we might be able to use to get around some of the issues. Apple genuinely went above and beyond the call of duty, and we’re really thankful for their help. We got extremely close and jumped over a lot of tricky hurdles thanks to them.

Unfortunately, though, we’ve run out of time.

Coda 2.5 is essentially complete. But, we’re still encountering sandboxing challenges. So, in the interest of finally getting Coda 2.5 out the door and in the hands of you, our very eager and patient customers, we’ve decided it’s time to move on—for now.

In short: Coda 2.5 will not be sandboxed, and therefore will not be available in the Mac App Store.

Please note that this doesn’t mean Coda 2.5 was rejected by Apple, rather that we’re going ahead and proactively making this call since all Mac App Store apps are required to be sandboxed and Coda 2.5 will not be.

The good news? Three-fold.

  1. The transition will be effortless.
  2. Your workflow will now be unscathed.
  3. We’re adding Panic Sync.

Read on.

• I bought Coda in the App Store. What do I need to do?

Nothing right now. Keep App Store Coda on your system and use it.

Then, when Coda 2.5 is released, you’ll simply download Coda 2.5 directly from our website. It’ll locate your installed Mac App Store copy, and it will unlock. That’s it. You’ve transitioned. Free of charge.

• What about iCloud Sync of my sites?

iCloud requires the App Store, so that’s out. But we have great news. We never want to short-change our paying customers, so we’ve spent many months working on Panic Sync, our own super-easy, super-secure syncing solution that gives you power over your data. And Panic Sync will work between Panic apps—Coda and Diet Coda to start. And Panic Sync is free. In short, we’ll trade you iCloud for something great.

• What about automatic updating?

Still there. Coda has a great built-in updater. In fact, you’ll get critical updates faster than ever before.

• What about easy installation on a new computer?

We love that part of the Mac App Store. Sigh. But from now on, you’ll have to download Coda 2.5 directly from our website. Hopefully, that’s a very minor inconvenience; we’ll make sure it downloads fast and easy.

• Will Coda ever be sandboxed or return to the App Store?

We hope so! We will always evaluate the possibility of sandboxing with each future release of Coda.

• What’s new in Coda 2.5? When will it be released?

Shh… we’ve been posting sneak peeks of new features on Twitter. And we’re in late beta, but no date is set.

Thank you so much for reading and understanding. Most importantly, thank you for using Coda!

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Wanted: Support Agents (2013) http://www.panic.com/blog/wanted-support-agents-2013/ http://www.panic.com/blog/wanted-support-agents-2013/#comments Mon, 18 Nov 2013 23:26:29 +0000 http://www.panic.com/blog/?p=5350 As we head into 2014, a new opportunity to join the Panic team has arisen. Love Panic’s apps? Love problem solving? Love typing? And love making people feel good by helping?

We’ve been looking for you.

We are seeking front-line technical support agents to promptly answer emailed or tweeted inquiries about our entire product line.

Ideally, you’ve got:

  • Excellent problem-solving, and ability to “read between the lines” of customer emails
  • Substantial Mac OS X, iOS, and internet experience
  • Familiarity with FTP, SFTP, WebDAV and troubleshooting of computer networks
  • A professional, courteous, and personable email disposition
  • A pleasant personality, patience, and sense of humor

Bonus Points for:

  • Engineering / computer science experience
  • Familiarity with the Panic product line
  • Ability to enter zen-like state of high-speed e-mail answering

You must live in Portland, Oregon or be willing to relocate to Portland. It’s honestly a very nice place.

In addition to base salary, Panic offers:

  • Bi-annual profit-sharing bonuses
  • Annual retirement plan contributions
  • Full medical/vision/dental insurance
  • Flexible vacation policy
  • Reasonable, life-compatible hours
  • A very nice work environment, we think

Sound good? E-mail your resume to us and if we’re interested, we will send you additional details and possibly schedule an interview. UPDATE 2/2014: This position has been filled. Thanks!

While we won’t be able to write back to everyone, we really thank you for your interest!

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The Panic Office http://www.panic.com/blog/the-panic-office/ http://www.panic.com/blog/the-panic-office/#comments Mon, 14 Oct 2013 20:42:51 +0000 http://www.panic.com/blog/?p=5144 It’s time.

Now, technically, Panic Inc. started in Steve’s bedroom. Then we shared an apartment, then another apartment, then moved into a small office. Finally, a few years ago, we landed in the newest Panic Office — one we got to design and build out from scratch, from empty raw shell to finished product. I’ve been promising a photo tour of our office forever, and I think I’ve held off because I secretly wanted this space to keep feeling “special” — our space, a space that could surprise guests, not just a long-scrolling page on the internet. But, it’s been a while, and it’s hard to invite the entire internet over for lunch.

So, let’s do this. Please join me on a complete photo tour of the Panic Office.

The History.

Our building was once part of Portland’s Auto Row on Burnside. We confirmed this when the concrete guys stripped the paint from our floors — they found (and were very concerned by) perfectly spaced rows of permanent oil stains. There could be no doubt we’re sitting in a once-garage. So awesome.

Office-History-1

The Planning.

We knew a few things. We wanted an open space for everyone to share. (Open space? Sure. We’re usually really quiet. And when we do talk, it’s often something important where it’s nice to have team input. Or we’re workshopping jokes for Twitter.) We knew we needed a conference room for discussion. We needed a nice kitchen. And I loved the view from the roof.

But what does Panic look or feel like? It’s hard to express the “Panic Feeling” to others.

Our architect, Chris, eventually whittled everything I told him down to three key thoughts:  we want to be ‘cool’ without being austere, we want to be ‘fun’ without being zany, and we want to exude an air of importance, but with a wink. With some inspiration from Louis Kahn’s Yale University Art Gallery (and, personally, Epcot Center) we got to dreaming. And sketching. And rendering.

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The Buildout.

I couldn’t help myself. I walked over every day to check on the construction. I’m sure they hated it. But as an added bonus, I got to correct the odd annoying wall-mounted conduit or poorly-planned light before it was too late.

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The Grand Opening.

Finally, almost a year later, it was done.

We moved in, and it felt good — like we were maybe, finally, a real deal.

Here it is, day one:

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The Signage

Neven and I couldn’t resist getting 8-bit-nerdy with the office signage. Maybe someday we can use our own game characters.

Instagram-Sign2Instagram-Sign1Instagram-Sign3Instagram-Sign4Instagram-Sign5Instagram-Sign6Instagram-Sign10Instagram-Sign12Instagram-Sign13Instagram-Sign14

The Living Room.

It’s done. We’re moved in. But we didn’t stop there. (We’re certainly not short on ideas.)

With the help of our interior designer, Andee, we first decided to spice up our “Living Room” area with a little more life, so we commissioned a pattern. And that pattern beget a rug. And pillows. And tables. And a curtain…

Office-Pattern

Office-Finished-8

Office-Finished-9

(If you look very closely at the pattern, you might recognize some old friends.)

Then, The Planning of Something Interesting.

We had a little phone closet, for the occasional (rare) phone call. A tiny corner, three ceiling lights, a nice window.

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We thought we could dream up something a little more special. So, with Andee, we got to work.

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The Founders Room

So now, behind this secret wall…

founders-door

…we have something rather special:

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(That amazing oil painting of myself and Steve as creepy old retired businessmen — why is Steve in a naval uniform, we’re not sure — came from a digital photo we took, sent to to Dafen, China, and turned into hand-painted magic. And there’s a hidden booze cabinet you’ll have to find on your own…)

The New Carpet and The New Wall.

We also later decided that the green checkerboard carpet lacked a little life, a certain energy. So we replaced it — and in the process wrapped it right onto the plain back wall.

office-carpet

Office-NewCarpet-2

The Rooftop Hills

Finally, our rooftop deck was a great way to breathe fresh air, but we had a serious glare problem during sunny days. We solved it in the only way we know how: artificial, astroturf, Super Mario 3-styled hills.

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The Guests.

The most rewarding part of building something like this is seeing how other people view our space, when we have guests or (rare) open houses and then check Instagram.

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And Finally, The Bonus: Panoramas.

Here are some amazing 360° panoramas of our office, during and after construction!

Thank you for visiting our office.

Credits

Principal Architect: Chris Hodney, Holst Architecture
Interiors, Founders Room, Hills: Andee Hess, Osmose Design
General Contractor: R&H Construction
Founders Room Contractor: GRADA Inc.
Living Room Pattern: Pattern People
Ridiculous Oil Painting: QPaintings.com
Panoramas: Matt D. Smith
Photo Credits: Chris Hodney, Buzz Andersen, Andee Hess, Instagram

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Wanted: iOS / OS X Engineers (2013) http://www.panic.com/blog/wanted-ios-os-x-engineers-2013/ http://www.panic.com/blog/wanted-ios-os-x-engineers-2013/#comments Fri, 12 Jul 2013 00:08:58 +0000 http://www.panic.com/blog/?p=5052 Panic Inc has a very special opportunity for nice, creative, super-talented engineers to join our amazing, award-winning-even development team.

Are you our experienced OS X / iOS engineer?

Our ideal candidate will:

  • Care deeply about both form and function
  • Debug, refine, and extend our existing apps
  • Contribute code and passion to new apps
  • Look for opportunities to improve our process
  • Play well with our existing team
  • Be excited and mostly eyeroll-free when tackling new challenges
  • Feel a strong sense of self-motivation
  • Love making things for people

We also prefer candidates who have shipped an app — no matter how small the app, or how small your part.

In addition to base salary, Panic offers:

  • Bi-annual profit sharing bonuses
  • Annual retirement plan contributions
  • Full medical/vision/dental insurance
  • Flexible vacation policy
  • Reasonable, life-compatible hours
  • A very nice work environment we think

Take note: this position is in Portland, OR. (We’ll pay for your move if you need to.)

Sound interesting? E-mail your resume to us (Update 8/5: thanks for your interest! We’ve reached our candidate limit!) and attach or link us to an app you’ve created or worked on. (Make sure to tell us what you did in that app, no matter how small.)

Also let us know if you’re more experienced with iOS or OS X development.

If we’d like to talk further, we will follow-up with additional details!

While we can’t write back to everyone, we thank you in advance for your interest.

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The Panic Status Board: 2013 Edition http://www.panic.com/blog/panic-status-board-2013-edition/ http://www.panic.com/blog/panic-status-board-2013-edition/#comments Fri, 03 May 2013 19:04:14 +0000 http://www.panic.com/blog/?p=4852 You might be familiar with where it all started: the status board we put on our Panic office wall in 2010.

Since then, as you may know, we turned that status board into an iPad app called Status Board. Now everyone can have a cool, beautiful, data-packed status board on their desk or wall.

And since we built the app, we rebuilt our status board, making it twice as good! (Literally.)

Panic Status Board

No, you’re not seeing double — this time we went with two goofy screens of stuff.

It’s pretty glorious.

About The Panels

Here are some implementation notes on our board:

Status Board - RevenueTraditionally Panic is quiet about how-are-we-doing data. It always feels like a possible distraction for our hard-working team. But we’re always changing, and this revenue Graph panel has been fascinating. Every day a script totals up our direct sales data, then retrieves our App Store sales data using AppFigures and their nice API. The totals get dumped into a database, and then we make that available via a simple PHP script that outputs JSON to the Status Board. That might sound tricky, but all told it took about a day of work to make happen.
Status Board - UnitsUnits have been especially interesting since they reveal so much about the economics of (our) iOS software, as this Graph panel shows. Although (our) iOS apps sell a respectable number of units, the revenue they bring in barely charts compared to our Mac stalwarts. So far! We’re working hard on improving our iOS apps, and trying new ideas, in order to crack the iOS market a little bit more. (Sorry this chart was pre-Status Board, which is doing well!) By the way, Graph documentation is here.
Status Board - InboxThe Support team works tirelessly to fight this tide! This is just an Email panel, which ties into our IMAP server. It took about 3 minutes to set up, and has been incredibly useful to see what our support load is at a very quick glance. (On the server, each Support person shares a single “Help” IMAP account, which has folders for each support person, and a script distributes the incoming support requests round-robin style.)
Status Board - SentConversely, this Graph panel this is a great way to quickly see how many support responses are going out the door. (Of course, it’s not a competition — it’s just for fun.) To get accurate Sent counts, we have a script that looks at both outgoing Twitter replies, and outgoing e-mails, and totals them up per-person into JSON.
Status Board - ProjectsThis list is using our Table panel, connecting to an HTML file on our server. (Table documentation is here.) This is an edited version to protect our secret projects, of course. A project list is always tricky, since it’s the most manually-updated thing on the board, and always runs the risk of being stale. But, it’s fun to see who’s working on what.
Status Board - Sparkle
What version of OS X are our users using? Using StatHat, which lets you track data incredibly quickly, I added one line of code to our PHP script that handles Sparkle updates. StatHat can output to Status Board natively via the Graph panel. Boom: instant OS version graph. (Also, fascinating how people use our Mac apps during the day, and not very much on the weekend.)
Status Board - Car2GoThis is our car2go map, so we can quickly see if there are any cars near the office that we can hijack and drive home at the end of the day. It’s totally custom — we’re using the Do-It-Yourself panel so it’s just a little web page on our server. We signed up for the car2go API and combined their data with Google maps and some nice CSS animation. If enough people are interested, we might make this available to others. (Does your city have car2go?)
Status Board - TriMetThis is another Do-It-Yourself panel to show everyone’s bus lines. Sometimes end-of-the-day conversations are abruptly interrupted when we notice a bus is nearby. Logan has more recently made his own TriMet panel that we like a lot.
Of course, we’re also using the stock Weather, Twitter, and RSS panels for different things. And naturally, the Clock, to show the current time in Portland, Seattle, and San Francisco. You know, for conference call scheduling.

Hardware Notes

  • This time, we chose the Samsung DE55A 55″ Professional Display. Bright, thin bezel, built to stay on.
  • To cover up the Samsung logo, we used a piece of black non-glare artist tape. (Electrical tape was too shiny.)
  • We installed a double gang outlet in the wall, to support 2 TV’s and 2 iPad chargers. Permanent power.
  • We applied 3M Magnet Tape to the back of our iPads. They just stick right to the back of the display:

Back

As people continue to build new things, our Status Board seems to change every week. Since taking these photos we’ve already added GoSquared, SNMP traffic graphs, and much more. That’s the best/worst thing about Status Board: it’s now so easy to make a cool Status Board that it’s hard to know when to stop. But hey, it’s fun!

If you’ve used Status Board to make a cool status board, send us a photo!

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Status Board Mania! http://www.panic.com/blog/status-board-mania/ http://www.panic.com/blog/status-board-mania/#comments Fri, 12 Apr 2013 20:34:36 +0000 http://www.panic.com/blog/?p=4811 It’s only been about a day since we unleashed our Status Board app to the world, and we’ve been truly astonished by the amount of cool things people have built to make it even more useful and amazing.

Here are some of the greatest things we’ve seen so far.

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Dead Simple Greatness. One click for new things:

  • TubeTracker — an incredible one-click layout for people in the UK who rely on the tube (pictured above)
  • AAPL — simple panel for Apple’s stock price (don’t follow too closely or you’ll go crazy)
  • LastFM — see your last-listened track
  • App Store Review Times —  a great way to see how busy Apple is
  • WWDC Alert — but really, how fast are tickets going to sell out this year
  • Bart Arrival Times — for those of you in San Francisco

New Native Sources. Direct-from-the-source data for your Status Board.

  • LeafPing — output your Envato sales data to Status Board. An example.
  • uri.lv — track your podcast statistics on the big screen.
  • AppViz — this must-have app for App Store sales tracking can now output to Status Board
  • Don’t forget our amazing launch sources: StatHat (so useful!) and Hockey.

Sources/Conduits. Some code experience necessary to get these going:

  • Nest — a quick look at the temperatures on N
  • Server Statistics — keep an eye on your server loads
  • OmniFocus — a Python conduit to get your tasks up and running
  • Google Analytics — 7-day website stats
  • Jenkins — display running jenkins jobs in a table
  • TimeTiger — interestingly, a Windows app for time tracking
  • Mint Analytics  — a Pepper to create Status Board-compatible web stats
  • Mite — time tracking reports
  • Things — a way to get your Things to-do lists up and running
  • AppFigures 1 — a conduit for displaying your AppStore sales data
  • AppFigures 2 — another simple PHP conduit for AppStore sales data
  • BitBucket Issues — track open issues in Git/Mercurial hosted source

(And you can always add a new Do-It-Yourself panel and point it to always-running Mario.)

We’ve heard of some fantastic web services working on native Status Board data, including AppFigures and GoSquared. Stay tuned!

Finally, some unofficial third-party sites are springing up to track new things: Pinboard, StatusBoardWidgets.com, and StatusBoardApp.info.

And we love seeing photos of people’s Status Board installations, such as this one in a Ducati dealership:

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Keep sending us your cool things! Tweet to @panic or give us an e-mail!

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Introducing Status Board. Beautiful data for all. http://www.panic.com/blog/introducing-status-board-for-ipad-beautiful-data-for-all/ http://www.panic.com/blog/introducing-status-board-for-ipad-beautiful-data-for-all/#comments Wed, 10 Apr 2013 20:46:07 +0000 http://www.panic.com/blog/?p=4783 Quite some time ago, we made a cool Status Board for the Panic office.

We were immediately taken by how awesome and important data becomes when it’s displayed in a beautiful layout in a prominent way. To glance up and see how the support inboxes were looking was priceless. It became the closest thing we had to a water cooler (second to our weird snack wall). It’s our focal point.

We thought: everybody deserves this kind of beautiful data.

So we got to work and made an iPad app. We built easy-to-use panels for anybody, to quickly see tweet counts, mailbox counts, news feeds, weather, and more. We built pro panels to display graphs and tables that can be fed with simple data feeds and be used to display virtually anything imaginable. We made it incredibly easy to set up. We made it look good sitting on your desk while you work. And (as an extra in-app purchase for professionals) we even added TV Out so you can throw this data up on your wall on a giant dedicated screen, for real.

Introducing Status Board. A brand new iPad app from Panic for displaying your data.

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But this is just the beginning: our 1.0. Tell us what panels you’d like to see added. Tell us how you use it, or you’d like to use it. Let us know if you find any bugs by e-mailing us. We’ll be listening and working like crazy as always.

(Thanks to Greg, Neven, Dave, Kenichi, James, and the whole Panic crew for their excellent work on this.)

And stay tuned for a blog post about our new internal Panic Status Board on the office wall — which is now using, of course, this new app. It’s twice as amazing.

PS: Remember how we got obsessed with the poor video quality of the Lightning AV Adapter? Now you know why!

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Coda 2.0.8 Beta 1 http://www.panic.com/blog/coda-2-0-8-beta-1/ http://www.panic.com/blog/coda-2-0-8-beta-1/#comments Fri, 05 Apr 2013 22:23:37 +0000 http://www.panic.com/blog/?p=4775 The wheels continue to turn: here’s a test of Coda 2.0.8.

We’re working on bigger additions to Coda, but in the meantime we’ve been fixing lots of little things. This update should improve stability and speed, and adds Transmit 4.3 favorites importing.

If you’re interested, get Coda 2.0.8b1 here (52 MB).

If you find anything weird, let us know ASAP via Hive!

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Wanted: Office Manager & Non-Technical Support http://www.panic.com/blog/wanted-office-manager-non-technical-support/ http://www.panic.com/blog/wanted-office-manager-non-technical-support/#comments Tue, 12 Mar 2013 18:37:38 +0000 http://www.panic.com/blog/?p=4746 Hello! Panic, Inc., a software developer for Mac, iPhone, and iPad is seeking an Office Manager at our 15-employee headquarters in Portland, OR. A rare, non-technical Panic job!

Candidate must already live in the Portland area, and be able to start immediately. Our office is located downtown, across from Powell’s Books. This is a full-time position.

Typical job duties include:

  • Being on-site weekdays from 9 AM – 6 PM to answer / screen phone calls, take messages, and receive deliveries and visitors
  • Answering general support emails, helping users get up and running, and forwarding technical questions when necessary
  • Handling voicemails and, somehow, faxes
  • Writing checks and paying bills immediately
  • Coordinating occasional social and corporate events such as company dinners, talks, conferences
  • Recording company meetings
  • @answering non-technical queries via Twitter
  • Responding to credit card disputes and refunds
  • Following up with purchase orders for payment (accounts receivable)
  • Providing price quotes for companies interested in volume purchases
  • Maintaining office calendar (who’s in/out, any upcoming special events, birthdays)
  • Scanning receipts and verifying purchase data
  • Keeping the dishwasher sane
  • Welcoming guests & making travel reservations
  • Unexpected Cabel Tasks and miscellaneous errands

Technical knowledge beyond email and word processing is a definite plus, as is a sense of humor and easy-going attitude. We’d love someone who has a fondness for our products and technology in general. But being organized and reliable is critical.

In addition to base salary, Panic offers:

  • Medical, dental, and vision coverage after 90 days
  • Bi-annual profit-sharing bonuses
  • SEP IRA retirement plan contributions after first year
  • Flexible vacation policy
  • Reasonable, life-compatible hours
  • Convenient central Downtown location
  • Free TriMet passes and bike storage
  • A very beautiful and inspiring office, we think

Candidates of every race, gender, nationality, age, and orientation are encouraged to apply.

Sound good? E-mail your resume to us, (UPDATE: This position has been filled. Thanks!) and tell us about yourself. If we’re interested, we will send you additional details and possibly schedule an interview. While we won’t be able to write back to everyone, we really thank you for your interest!

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