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Another Quick Test, Cabel

August 31st, 2012

We’re almost done with Coda 2.0.3, as we keep Coda updates flowing frequently and consistently to make it the best it can be.

Interested? Please download Coda 2.0.3b1.zip and give it a whirl. (Update: Coda 2.0.3 is now available.)

If you find a bug login to Hive, our bug tracker, and file it well.

(No feature suggestions, please, just things that aren’t working right.) Thanks!

Posted at 1:58 pm 18 Comments

Quick Testing Time, Cabel

August 21st, 2012

We’re wrapping up a couple of updates — if you have a moment of spare time, and are feeling testy, we’d love your stamp of approval.

If you find a bug in either, please login to Hive, our bug tracker, and file!

Posted at 1:50 pm 52 Comments

From the desk of Cabel
Portland, Oregon 97205

CandyBar, Mountain Lion, and Beyond

A quick update on CandyBar!

Updated for 10.8.

First, we’ve updated CandyBar for Mac OS X 10.8! You can now customize the 10.8 system icons. Just launch the app and click the big “Update” button to get the latest IconData.

But there’s a catch, or two: in Mountain Lion, Apple changed how the Dock is rendered, so it’s no longer possible to customize the Dock’s look. (You can still customize the indicator lights!) Also, CandyBar still can’t change the internal icons of Mac App Store apps, due to code signing.

CandyBar, although simply changing files on disk, has always fallen into a slightly-uncomfortable-for-us grey area of existence. It seems clear to us that there will undoubtedly come a time (soon?) when CandyBar can no longer customize system icons at all. So, what do we do?

Now free, and unsupported.

Since we’re unsure about the long-term future of changing system icons, we’re not comfortable charging money for CandyBar, and we’re also not comfortable simply making it disappear, instead we’re going to make the current CandyBar free — but unsupported.

That said, being CandyBar fans, we’ll strive to keep CandyBar up-to-date with minor 10.8 releases, so you can keep using it for the foreseeable future! But, if something major changes, on the level of the Dock changes in 10.8, we can’t guarantee compatibility.

First, here’s the latest build of the app:


Then, here’s a serial number everyone can use:

PPQA-YAMA-E3KP-VHXG-B6AL-L

Even if technically unsupported, CandyBar is still super cool. We hope you enjoy it.

(Also, if you bought CandyBar from us in July or so, we will refund you. If interested, e-mail the Iconfactory.)

Finally, CandyBar heads to The Iconfactory.

So where does CandyBar go from here? Well, there’s the other half of the app: the convenient icon organizer, and Quick Drop icon changer, that many of us use often. We’re handing the reins of CandyBar over to our friends at The Iconfactory. They’ve got some thoughts on CandyBar’s future, and where they might take it from here. If you bought CandyBar from us, you will of course be considered if something new shows up. Stay tuned.

Thanks for reading! If you have any questions, please contact support@iconfactory.com.

TL;DR: CandyBar updated for 10.8, but changing system icons won’t work forever, so CandyBar is now free and unsupported — and may turn into something new at The Iconfactory later.

Posted at 11:55 am 387 Comments

Diet Coda: What Would You Like?

And hey, why not do a poll for Diet Coda also? Please let us know where would you like to see Diet Coda go in the future!

Please note: just because something is on this list does not guarantee that it will be added to Diet Coda! 

You get three votes — so, vote for your top 3 dream features! And if what you really, really want isn’t listed, simply type it into “Other” and we’ll get it. (But if it’s already in the app, you lose 50 points!)

Thanks in advance!

 

Posted at 2:22 pm 36 Comments

Coda: What Would You Like?

Hi, guys! Let’s try something new! For the past few weeks we’ve been putting together a list of the most-requested features for Coda, and we’re very curious which ones people care the most about.

Please note: just because something is on this list does not mean that it will be added to Coda! We’re just testing the waters here.

You get three votes — so, vote for your top 3 dream features! And if what you really, really want isn’t listed, simply type it into “Other” and we’ll get it. (But if it’s already in the app, you lose 50 points!)

That’s all. Click away. We’ll be listening!

 

Posted at 2:07 pm 138 Comments

Wanted: Support Agent

Love Panic software? Love helping people? Love problem solving? Secretly or not-so-secretly enjoy breaking things?

Holy cats, do we need your help!

We are looking for a front-line technical support agent to promptly answer emailed inquiries about our entire product line.

Ideally, you’ve got:

  • Excellent problem-solving, and ability to “read between the lines” of customer emails
  • Substantial Mac OS X, iOS, and internet experience
  • Familiarity with FTP, SFTP, WebDAV and troubleshooting of computer networks
  • A professional, courteous, and personable email disposition
  • A pleasant, easy-going personality and sense of humor

Bonus Points for:

  • Engineering / computer science experience
  • Familiarity with the Panic product line
  • Ability to enter zen-like state of high-speed e-mail answering

You must live in Portland or be willing to relocate to Portland. It’s honestly a very nice place.

In addition to base salary, Panic offers:

  • Bi-annual profit-sharing bonuses
  • Annual retirement plan contributions
  • Full medical/vision/dental insurance
  • Flexible vacation policy
  • Reasonable, life-compatible hours
  • A very nice work environment, we think

Sound good? E-mail your resume to us. If we’re interested, we will send you additional details and possibly schedule an interview. While we won’t be able to write back to everyone, we really thank you for your interest!

Posted at 4:31 pm 3 Comments

Copywriter: Cabel.

Yay! 4th of July Fireworks 2012!

Look, I’ll be honest, the selection wasn’t super great this year.

But I’m not going let that stop this critical annual tradition of me sharing my favorite fireworks packaging. If you haven’t, get up to speed with 2007200820092010, and 2011!

This year’s crop includes:

Confusing Euphemisms


Awkward Typos

…Shore?

An Eerily Accurate Look at Sandboxing (including the “Flaming Balls”)

Questionable Concepts

The formula for Barium Nitrate used as a decorative element? Why not

Old-Fashioned Copyright Infingement

To be fair, they did ‘shop out the nose ring

Low-Grade Racism

The Two Greatest Words Ever Combined Together

Advanced Irony

Elaborate Attempts to Capture Julian Assange

And Finally, the Most Brutally Honest Fireworks Packaging Image, Ever

Enjoy your 4th, everybody!

Posted at 3:06 pm 13 Comments

From the desk of Cabel
Portland, Oregon 97205

Top 20 Secrets of Coda 2

Coda 2 is, as you probably know by now, a surprisingly capable app, and I’m here to help you get the most of it. My promise: give this post a few minutes of your time, and you’ll learn something you didn’t know about Coda 2! (If you don’t, I’ll send you a free tweet.)

1. Open A New File in a Split

After splitting your view in via the New Split button , there are three ways to open a new file in a fresh split. You can:

  1. Option-Double-Click a file in the sidebar, pathbar, or Files tab
  2. Drag any file to the pathbar of your freshly opened split
  3. Right click a file and say “Open in Split”

Done!

Bonus Tip: Hold “Option” while clicking the New Split button to change the split direction to vertical. Or, change your default direction in the Prefs.

2. Use the Golden HTML + CSS + Live Preview Setup

It’s the dream view, easy as pie. First, open your HTML file. Second, click the New Split button, and choose New Untitled to get a blank split. Now, using Tip #1, open your CSS file in this new split (we like dragging files to the pathbar). Finally, click back in your first HTML split, click the New Split button again, and choose Preview.

That’s it. The best part: as you tweak your CSS, your changes will be applied live in the Preview!

3. Explore the Preferences

That reminds us — and, ok, this is a pretty lame tip — but we really recommend it: take a few minutes to check out each of the Preferences panels. You’ll likely find something you didn’t know you could do!

4. Create Site Groups

Just covering the basics: you do know that you can make Site Groups, right? To do so, simply drag a site onto another site. That’s it — just like in iOS, you can now open up the Site Group, re-arrange the members of that group, drag new items in, etc. Great for organizing jobs per client!

5. Use Text Tabs

First, did you know the tab bar was resizable? Just drag the bottom. Second, did you know that if you keep resizing the tab bar all the way down, Coda switches to space-saving Text Tabs?

6. Hide or Show Specific File Types

You don’t want to see all the hidden files littering your server. But you do want to see .htaccess files. Sure, you can turn on “Show Invisible Files”, but then it’s all or nothing, right?

Wrong! Click the Rules tab in Preferences, and you can have Coda show or hide certain types!

7. Preview in a Simulated iPhone/iPad

What happens when you change the “User Agent” in Preview to something iPhone/iPad related?  Unbelievably, this happens:

It’s just an approximation — and it’s comical if you try to use the web inspector in this view — but for mobile developers, it gives you a nice head start on layout.

To change the User Agent, just click the Preview gear menu in the bottom bar.

8. Access the Code Navigator in the Path Bar

You might already know about the Navigator, the handy Sidebar tool that lets you easily jump to pieces of your code.

But did you know that if you click the document name in the Path Bar, you can access the Navigator right then and there?

9. Add Custom Bookmarks to the Navigator

It’s fine and dandy to have your named HTML elements show up in the navigator, but what if you could add any line to it, like a bookmark? You totally can. In any syntax mode, just type a comment and prefix its contents with a !, like so:

/* !Page start */

Or, single-line-comment style:

// !Bookmark

It’ll then show up as a bookmark in the Code Navigator:

10. Quickly Jump to Line

Here’s a little one: double click the line number in the bottom bar, and you get a handy jump to line pop-up. (You can also hit ⌘⇧L.)

11. Discover the Books

Ok, so our built-in Books aren’t quite a “Secret”, but they’re so dramatically overhauled in Coda 2 that I really don’t want you to miss them.

To add a book to your tabs, click the Tab Plus, then Book. Try the HTML book — it’s an extremely efficient and fast way to quickly get reference.

Bonus Tip: our docs are available online, anywhere. Check out HTML, CSS, PHP, and Javascript.

12. Browse CSS Styles Inline

If you’re like me, you often forget a lot of CSS rules. The solution? When starting a new, blank line in a CSS style declaration, open the autocomplete menu by hitting “esc” and choose the “Styles” pop, and you get this:

Handy!

13. Preview in a New Window

Got a huge screen? Click the Preview gear menu, and choose Preview In ▸ New Window.

14. Quickly Wrap Text in a Tag

Type some text. Select it. Then choose Text ▸ Wrap in Tag or hit ⌘< and behold: an instant tag. But it’s just a <div> tag, right? Wrong. Notice that the “div” is already selected. Now, whatever you type will be inserted into the opening and closing tag, simultaneously, automatically!

15. Blockedit Multiple Lines at Once

Quickly make changes to multiple lines at once. To do so, hold Option while dragging a text selection. Now, type within that selection. Any text is applied to all lines!

Hit “Escape” to clear your blockedit selection. In the future, there’s even more we hope to do here.

16. Use Quick Open

If you’re working locally, quickly open any file by clicking the Quick Open button on the left of the Path Bar. Type a few letters, and bam: there are your relevant files. You can also open this window with Control-Q. Repeat, Control-Q.

17. Discover the Text Processing Menu

Need to quickly encode accents? Remove line breaks? Don’t miss the Text ▸ Processing menu!

18. Drag Your Favorite Folders to Places

Have a folder you use a lot in a certain Site? Open Places in the sidebar, and just drag it in. Places acts as a per-site “favorites” for your most-used folders.

19. Quickly Jump to CSS in Preview

(Note: this tip requires Coda 2.0.2 or newer, which is coming soon.)

You can now instantly jump from Preview to a relevant piece of your CSS with a simple right click.

Best of all: if you don’t have the relevant CSS file open, we’ll even open it for you!

20. Bonus Tip: Customize Keyboard Shortcuts

It’s possibly one of the greatest hidden features in Mac OS X, and works for almost all apps.

First, open System Preferences ▸ Keyboard, and click Keyboard Shortcuts.

Now, select “Application Shortcuts” on the left, and click the “Plus” .

From the pop-up menu, choose Coda 2. Now, let’s type in “Something…”, and give it the shortcut of our choosing!

(If the menu item uses an ellipsis, it’s important that you use one here! Hit Option-Semicolon to type it.)

That’s it! Without even having to relaunch Coda, your shortcut has been added.

Enjoy the hot tips!

Posted at 2:31 pm 169 Comments

From the desk of Steven
Portland, Oregon 97205

Update on Coda 2.0.1, Mac App Store version

Update: Coda 2.0.1 is now available in the Mac App Store.

Many of you are waiting very patiently for the Coda 2.0.1 update to become available on the Mac App Store. We wanted to give you a quick update on where it stands.

We submitted Coda 2.0.1 to the Mac App Store on June 4; the same time we released it to our direct customers. Yesterday, after 10 days of waiting in queue, we received notification that it has entered review. It has been in that state for approximately 24 hours. We have heard rumors that many of the review staff are at WWDC this week, making an already slow approval process even slower. But hopefully, it will get approved within the next few days, and we won’t have any rejection setbacks.

I wish there was more we could do to speed things along, but this is simply the App Store process. It is almost as maddening for us as it is for those of you suffering crashes and waiting for an update.

Because this is such a bad situation, we are researching some ways we might be able to allow App Store customers to temporarily use direct versions while waiting for an update in the future. There are a few technical hurdles to get over first, not the least of which is the Apple-mandated feature disparity between the direct and App Store versions (in particular, iCloud-related functionality).

Please bear with us as we try to make the best of a disappointing situation.

Thanks again for your patience, and we hope 2.0.1 will be available for Mac App Store customers shortly.

Posted at 11:05 am 82 Comments

From the desk of Cabel
Portland, Oregon 97205

Coda Credits

It’s been two weeks since we shipped two major apps, and it’s been a whirlwind. But before I forget, if you’ll indulge me, I’d like to take a moment to say thanks to the small team of incredibly smart and talented people made Coda 2 and Diet Coda possible.

Coda 2 was led by Wade and Will, who care about every line of code in what has become a very complex app. Dan and Logan joined later, and pushed the finished product into greatness. Think of how many employees an Adobe or Apple has, then realize the very-complex Coda 2 was basically engineered by four people at its peak. Smartest guys in the industry, I tell you.

Diet Coda’s origins start with Dave, and Prompt. (True story: Prompt was only intended to be the terminal in Diet Coda, and a testbed for our very complex text view. Only later did we make it its own app.) Then Garrett joined the team, jumped in head-first and, from file browsers to syntax highlighters, brought it all together with Dave. These two are amazing.

There’s more: Kenichi faced very tough icon challenges and created gorgeous things. Neven helped me with a nearly-infinite list of design to-do’s and took charge of Diet’s form and function. James is our sort-of modern day Mario, climbing the towering girders of bugs, automated builds, and submissions while jumping a seemingly infinite number of bizarre barrels being thrown at us by a grinning Apple. Les, Tim, and Mike held down the never-ending support channel, a thankless but critical task (and Tim helped build some amazing web pages), while Noby hit the road to really bring our products to prominence in Japan. All the while, Greg was building other cool things you’ll see soon.

We are very lucky, because there’s so much criss-crossing in here: it’s a true group effort. From the OpenGL magic of our SuperLoupe, to the understated power of our new path bar, to the WebKit craziness of our Coda 2 video tour, to our unique sidebar and dock thought up in the office shower, everyone here really excels at taking “what if” to “wow”. The products (and users) really win.

Coda 2 also had some outside help: our old friends at TheCodingMonkeys were responsible for lots of new core editor features. Brandon Sneed wrapped up Git support after Ian went to become a fancy doctor. Local web hero Thomas Reynolds built the cool Coda Pops — they’re actually HTML, you know. Rowan Beentje, and the entire Sequel Pro team, went beyond the call of duty to help us integrate and adapt their great work — even to the point of hunting down every past contributor to agree to a license change from GPL to BSD. Amazing.

Then, there’s our almost 200 beta testers, who, throughout the nearly five month long beta cycle, helped us fix and close an astonishing 546+ bugs. Each one of them made our apps better.

Finally, special thanks to you!!

And I mean this: you. You who are giddy with excitement on Twitter. You who tell your friends about our work. You who purchase our software and keep our company alive. You who, like us, find good software inspiring and life-enhancing. You are the fuel for our engine.

Thanks.

Love,
Cabel.

Posted at 3:09 pm 13 Comments